End of Summer – the Busy Season Begins

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finca eggs

This being the last day in September, we can state that we have all rooms full. Ok, it’s the weekend so it’s not that surprising. At the moment we have three Czechoslovakian and two Russians with us. It’s getting more international!

And because everybody loves it here and is interested in what we do, I thought we could involve people in an ‘olive harvesting experience’ on Airbnb. But to my surprise they didn’t think it lives up to their standards and expectations. We would have guests, a maximum of four, for three days. We would let them try their hand at harvesting the olives, bring them along to the factory, let them taste different types of eating olives and olive oils. Bring them to the oldest olive tree in El Rocio which is over 700 years old and feed them breakfast and a light lunch. I would prepare dinner on request. They would not be required to work hard, just a bit in the morning to enjoy the activity. And have the afternoon/evening free to discover the surrounding area or go to the beach. They can take the bikes or just chill on the terrasse. What’s not to like?

I would be grateful for some comments on this or maybe someone knows where to advertise this. But we can only do this while we are actually harvesting, which is between now (at the moment we are waiting for the factory to open any day) and January.

In the meantime we continued improving the property with a lovely step at the entrance and a rockery. We changed the curtains in our bedroom and added lime wood blinds, as ours is the hottest room because the sun shines into it from noon till sunset. Our third bedroom downstairs also received curtains to make it more homely.

The intense heat will slowly fade now and growth will take off again and that means it is time for gardening. It’s the opposite to what we are used to, winter being a restful period and time to sit by the fire with a hot port. No so here. I planted some cauliflower and broccoli plants and sowed varies tomato varieties as well as beans and hope we’ll be able to keep the chickens out of the vegetable plots.

Sweet Potato and Pumpkin Lentil Dhal

Here is a recipe for a vegan Lentil Dhal I made recently, which turned out so yummy I have to share it. The twist is a sprinkling of grated avocado stone. Yes, you can actually eat the avocado stone, which is a relief because it’s so big and my attempts to grow a plant from it have not been successful. You need to peel it and then grate it, it’s actually quite soft and tastes a bit like nutmeg, but nuttier.

Here you can read up on the health benefits https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/eating-avocado-seed#Benefits but the avocado stone has not received much study, so this is a rather cautious approach. Obviously you are not going to eat a whole stone in one go, just use it to sprinkle on muesli, in a smoothie or on your soup or plate of rice etc. I would use it as a condiment or spice, not as a main ingredient.

Ingredients for 4 people:

1 big cup of lentils, soaked in water overnight (I prefer the red or golden coloured lentils, it just looks a nicer colour)

2 tablespoons of virgin olive oil

1 vegetable stock cube

½ sweet potato, cut in cubes

equal amount of pumpkin, also in cubes

1 onion, chopped

3-6 garlic cloves, chopped

Spices: freshly ground black pepper, ground cumin, cinnamon, coriander seed

(use these spices to your liking, I normally don’t work with measures, just with intuition)

a teaspoon of freshly chopped ginger

a sprinkle of avocado stone and freshly chopped coriander or parley for decoration

How to:

Sweat the garlic and onion in olive oil, add the pumpkin and sweet potato cubes for 5-10 minutes. Add the stock and lentils, top up with water if necessary. You can serve this as a soup or as a main dish.

Add all spices. Simmer for about 40 minutes or until the lentils are soft. Liquidise with a food processor and adjust seasoning if necessary. Serve in bowls with a sprinkle of avocado stone and freshly chopped coriander or parley for decoration.

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summer garden produce (organic)

CASA HALCON on booking.com

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Yes, finally the last touches are being added and we are ready to open our house and finca for guests. Time to pop the cork!

The first bookings are coming in and soon we are also live on Airbnb.

And, since temperatures are soaring, we are installing a swimming pool. A big round over-ground thingy, 17.4 m3, 1 m deep which will give us some refreshment during the hottest months here when we won’t make it to the beach.

In the meantime another fiesta in Almonte is in preparation.

But first I want to tell you about our experience with the Romeria, which takes place each year at Pentecost.

El Rocio – The Romeria at Pentecost, see  https://rove.me/to/seville/el-rocio-pilgrimage  for footage and general information.

El Rocio is a town build on sand, therefore all its streets are pure sand and predestined to be used by horses, riders and carriages.

It also is a pilgrimage town, where throughout the year the brotherhoods, ‘hermandados’, meet to prepare for the biggest of the fiestas, the Romeria, at Pentecost. Last year we were just leaving for Portugal, when the throng of carriages, waggons and riders descended upon El Rocio. This year we watched the build-up in Almonte, where children and whole families were beautifully dressed in traditional costumes and flamenco dresses. Little girls complete with flowers in their hair, lipstick and dresses. Even little boys looked like their fathers in traditional leather riding boots, cummerbund, white shirts and hats, a lovely sight.

El Rocío Pilgrimage or Romería de El Rocío in Seville - Best Time

Some of the pilgrims passed-by our entrance.

We are people that shy away from crowds. This is our excuse, for this year anyway, not to join in the festivities in El Rocio. Instead we watched the religious fervour unfold on the television. There is a whole channel devoted to going-ons in Donana, the Nature Reserve and area here which includes Almonte, Matalascanas and El Rocio and the Donana National Park. This is a very catholic celebration of the Virgin of El Rocio, La Paloma Blanca, the white dove. Every hermandado has a float, richly decorated with flowers, drawn preferably by oxen or horses or mules. There are prayers, incantations and blessings. Not really our style. And to be wedged in between nearly a million dressed-up followers in the beating sun isn’t really our idea of fun.

However, we sneaked into town at sunset on the Sunday. Therefore my photos are very dark and some were too wobbly, as catching the carriages driving by or riders and lady’s on horseback proofed too much for my limited photographic talents. On this evening, an almighty downpour drenched the town and the revellers and big puddles need to be negotiated.  The floats are proudly displayed in a separate tent beside the place for the bow-top caravans for families that do not own a house in El Rocio. It is very much a family festivity and there does not seem to be much alcohol involved.

El Rocio, circa 15 kms from our house, at night: